Jacob Kaplan-Moss

Tag: django

Circles of Django (2007) March 22nd, 2007

So here’s a question I get asked a lot: “How big is Django’s community?” Anyone who works in open source knows that it’s basically impossible to know the size of any open source community. It’s easy with commercial programs – just look at the sales numbers – but since F/OSS is freely (and widely) available, there’s almost no way to know how many people are using your project. Still, the tie-wearing enterprisy business folks ask these types of questions, and it’s useful to have an answer ready.…

The Django community in 2009 November 6th, 2009

In March of 2007, I attempted to measure the size of Django’s community. That March turned out to be a major inflection point in Django’s growth: the release of 0.96 brought a lot of new features – testing and the new forms library being the critical ones – and those in turn brought in a lot of new users. Growth since then has been at a much faster pace. So I thought it’d be interesting to review the same metrics I used back then.…

The Django community in 2012 March 5th, 2012

In 2007, and again in 2009, I made an attempt to measure the size of the Django community. By popular request — okay, a couple people asked for it, whatever — let’s do this thing again. Users In 2007 and 2009, I shared three ways of looking at how many people are using Django: hits to the website, downloads of the Django tarball, and sites listed as “using Django.” So, here’s an overview of users, some notes on interpreting these numbers follow:…

Django's new governance model March 12th, 2020

Starting today, Django has a new governance model. Previously, a small “core team” made most decisions, including electing a Technical Board to own decisions about each release. Now, the “core team” is gone; all power rests with the Technical Board. Anyone who’s made substantial contributions to Django is now eligible to run, and the board is now elected by the DSF Membership at large. You can read more about the change in today’s announcement, and if you want to full details they’re in DEP 10.…

Preventing SQL Injection in Django May 15th, 2020

I wrote this article for r2c, a security startup I’ve been consulting for. They’ve been building Bento, a program analysis toolkit that can find bug through static anaylsys of Python code. It uses semgrep, a code search tool that understands Python syntax. I’ve been helping them figure out which kinds of checks matter to Django developers. SQL injection is one of the places we decided to start, and I wrote this article to explain the problem, solutions, and how Bento/semgrep can help.…